The Joy of the Magic Doorstep

“Not all of us can do great things.  But we can all do small things with great love”

Mother Teresa

In my experience of an advance cancer diagnosis people don’t really know what to say. Questions to understand it seem insensitive and risky as you have to be prepared for the answers.  Words of reassurance are tricky.  A lot of people opt for the head cocked and pitiful smile when they see you or just plain avoidance.   However, there are a pretty large and surprising number of people who opt for action.  

As an action junkie I relate to this as it is what I have done in similar situations. When you feel devoid of words, action speak volumes. Sometimes you just have to do something.

Back in May 2018 I was astonished with the direct and decisive action people from all areas of my life took. The night I got home from receiving the diagnosis one of my sister’s just turned up despite being told I was fine and didn’t need her to come.  Obviously, I was about as far away from fine as you can be, but I had to pick the kids up, feed them and get them to bed without falling apart. We didn’t tell them straight away. We didn’t know what to say. We hadn’t even told immediate family. We couldn’t find the words. We were in a trance like state. In fact we had a prior appointment with a will writer to do our LPAs and update our wills. So that is what we did on the evening of the day I was diagnosed with invasive advanced breast cancer. 

You can’t make these things up. 

In a film that would seem ridiculous, but in fact it was what we did that evening. It turned out to be a very practical thing to do. Having one of my sister’s there was a blessing as we were able to have difficult conversations about guardianship. Our original wills were no longer practical given the very real possibility that at least one of us would be taken too soon. 

My sister also took on the unenviable task of telling the rest of the family. After that, the wheels were in motion, everyone went into action mode. 

Within days of diagnosis, my sister said, ‘You’re going to need a big freezer’ I replied ‘what for?’ She said ‘all the meals’.  

She had inside knowledge from friends with a cancer diagnosis. It was a matter of days before my Dad turned up with a freezer and my extended family brought home cooked freezable food.  

But that wasn’t what my sister meant. 

Nothing could prepare me for the deluge of home cooked meals that would turn up on my doorstep as word got around. I’ve joked before about the number of lasagnes, but not one went to waste. Every casserole, spag bol, curry, cake, soup, biscuit, flapjack, crumble  and many more dishes of love were gratefully received.  They nourished us through those early trance-like days.  The blur of appointments and scans with news getting worse by the day.  We put one foot in front of the other and one home cooked meal in the oven and we got through it until we could think again.

We are still lucky enough to receive meals today and they are all a gift of time. Time that we don’t have to think about preparing a meal. Time we can spend with each other or on tasks that seem to take so much longer now.  It is not something we expect or always need, but it always makes us feel cared for and loved. One person in particular has never stopped giving us meals. She’s a wonderful cook and even has a drawer named after her in our freezer. There’s always something good in that drawer. We call her our ‘Cancer Angel’ and she is a very special woman who I have got to know in a deeper way since being diagnosed. 

As an aside, my then 6 year old, found all the meals confusing. She asked me if we were poor, now I had cancer. I was perplexed.  Where had this come from?  But soon I understood when she elaborated “but Mummy you always say ‘you have to go to school, Mummy and Daddy have to go to work to earn money to put food on the table and a roof over our heads’ and you haven’t been to work as much and people are already bringing us food”.

It all made sense from a 6 year old’s perspective.

All sorts of kindness poured onto our doorstep and through our letterbox. People and gifts showed up in all sorts of guises from all corners of our life and the world.  I was and continue to be truly humbled by peoples’s kindness. Amongst other things, we have been lucky enough to receive flowers, beautiful, honestly written cards, poetry books, magazines, books, Chemo kits,  fruit and veg, solid gold engraved lego brick, jewellery, good luck charms, bracelets, Christmas decorations, charms for good health, ice pillows (for night sweats), shawls (when my arm was too big for a coat) and just last night aloe vera socks for my peeling bleeding feet.

We also got several tomato plants and a courgette plant. One lot even arrived with its own grow bag. I loved planting these and enjoying the fruits of my labour all summer long. Reminding me of the thoughtfulness and kindness around me.  Feeling a sense of satisfaction when picking the fruit and making soup.  The simplicity of nourishment.  Overall we felt the power of kindness and community that can easily be forgotten or taken for granted in our busy and overly digital world. The simple gifts of kindness, the offers of help, lifts to appointments, walking companions, sourcing of outfits for school plays and childcare are invaluable. They also made me feel alive and that I mattered to lots of people. The outpouring of love and the genuine, real conversations I have with people I’ve known for years and other strangers has been humbling and a joy. I was never one for small talk.  I favour real conversations.

I have been toying with writing this post for a while. A sort of wide scale thank you note to everyone who has held us in their thoughts, sent us messages of encouragement, made us laugh and smile and held our hands through this unplanned and daunting journey. 

I am a strong person and I still favour helping over being helped. I am delighted that so many people ignored this and just stepped in. For the last couple of years we have donated to charity rather than sending Christmas cards. I also commit to phoning people who live further afield and have a proper chat with them, reconnecting rather than sending a card year after year. This year I haven’t phoned very many people. It is not because I haven’t got the energy, but it’s because I am more connected with the people that matter than ever before. This is one of cancer’s blessings. It cuts out the crap and brings families and friends closer together. Or it certainly has in my case.

This time of the year seems like a good time to celebrate and think about the importance of community and kindness. I’ve alway been a fan of and contributor to both. It matters and it makes a difference. Merry Christmas and thank you.

“It’s not how much we you do, but how much love we put into what you do that counts”

Mother Teresa

I am not religious in the traditional way and yet despite Mother Teresa’s catholic origins her words resonate with my beliefs. Her desire to put common humanity above religious divisions is something we should all strive to do. I do believe in spirituality and the sense of connection to something bigger than ourselves. Sometimes that belief and way of being is the only thing that keeps me going. We all need to look beyond ourselves.

24th December 2019

What does ‘stable’ really mean?

Heavy duty adult training wheels 18 stone

Yesterday I finally got my CT results from 3 weeks ago.  They are stable. But what does that actually mean? I don’t know how to feel about that word. It doesn’t excite or sadden me. It’s neutral. I feel like I’m in a holding circle outside Heathrow, not able to land or fly off. 

‘Stable’ definitely doesn’t ooze positivity. A political situation in a far off land that becomes ‘stable’ doesn’t have you rushing to book your next holiday there. Stable pension funds or economies are safer, but not a cause for celebration or a spend up. Riding a bike with stabilisers is an interim phase between falling off and riding properly.

I guess I’d rather not be falling off. 

Pretty much every appointment I’ve had in the last 20 months has been bad news or unfolding bad news or seemingly positive news that belied my clinical representation or turned out to be bad news due to a scanning error. 

Let’s just say I brace myself for bad news. I prepare for it, I seek to interrogate and understand it. I then accept it and move on to forming or executing the next plan of attack. I’m a problem solver by nature and profession. I’m an action junkie. I don’t know how to be around stable? I’m not organising a party and I’m not researching alternatives  or mobilising the NHS. It feels indifferent and passive and I don’t like it! 

My RECIST (response evaluation criteria in solid tumours) report shows a 1mm reduction in the size of my target lesion (the largest lymph node in my contralateral axilla). On 12th Sept scan it measured 19mm and on 19th Nov it measures 18mm. It’s going in the right direction, not enough for partial response (PR) to be classified, but not enough for progressive disease (PD) either. But here is the rub. That same 12 Sept scan was originally measured and reported by my previous hospital and the lymph node in question was reported as 16mm. 

Same raw data, different reporter. 

So based on the original report I have a 2mm growth.  In addition the same node was reported twice in the summer as being complete response to treatment (CR) and it measured 0mm! Yet I could still feel it and it felt like it was growing (and it was). See why I don’t trust scans! 

Now let’s go back to clinical evidence – or in lay terms – eyes and fingers. The lymph node in question feels smaller than it was when I started this second trial (that’s good right?), but it also feels like it has coalesced with the other enlarged lymph nodes to form a skinnier (technical term) yet longer mass.  So what are they actually measuring? 

On top of all of this my skin metastasises are growing. I have 3 reasonably significant ones and two tiny ones that I expect no one will acknowledge, but I know they feel exactly how the others did at the start. The biggest skin met has been biopsied and is definitely triple negative breast cancer cells. And yet I had a private ultrasound of my chest wall last week and the monographer said ‘there is nothing there’! I had to stop the sonographer and say I presume you mean on the scan as you can plainly see and feel them on my chest!  Of course that’s what she meant, but it made me feel like I was making it up! Even my 7 year old says ‘Mummy is that another cancer lump?’ And ‘that one is getting bigger isn’t it Mummy?’ How do I deal with ‘stable’ in this context? Even my daughter wants to know when I will switch to a treatment that actually works! 

She doesn’t get ‘stable’ either. 

A loved one in intensive care who is reported as stable doesn’t fill you with joy. You take a breath, you might be relieved, but you aren’t out of the woods. I guess a terminal cancer patient is never ‘out of the woods’, so maybe ‘stable’ is as good as it gets. I’m restless, I’m impatient, I get it.

In my case ‘stable’ is pretty hopeful. Dying’s on hold for a bit longer. Christmas can be ‘stable’ not disrupted by new treatment or adverse reactions. 

It’s still too passive for me. But I think that’s my nature. I perhaps need to turn off my ‘high alert’ button and give my para sympathetic system a rest over Christmas. Changing treatment over the festive period is never ideal (I did that last Christmas), so perhaps I need to take that very deep breath and try and ignore my sixth sense for another cycle of this wretched chemo. 

Right time to start taking those horse tablets. 

11th December 2019

The Path Beyond the Haze

I’ve been a little quiet in the last few weeks. There’s been a lot going on in and outside my head. I’ve not known where to start and didn’t want to be trite.

It’s not appropriate to discuss it in detail here, but we have been having a long term battle with systems that support our children to understand themselves, be understood and reach their potential. This has been a focus long before my cancer diagnosis, but it just got a whole lot more urgent due to me feeling like time was running out to fight their corner. Let’s just say it was on my bucket list to get done.

One day I hope my kids will see that using my energy and our money for their diagnoses will have more longevity and impact than a trip to Disney. I am determined that they are aware of their emotional and practical needs, how to ask for help and support to create and take opportunities in life.

My mum was always there for me (and still is), she put me before herself or others on so many occasions. Sometimes this was intense and difficult for me and other people in our life, but above all I have had the privilege and knowledge that I am loved immensely and unconditionally. I want my children to know that too. Like my mum I want to help them in practical ways, but also to help them know themselves and be proud of who they are. I hope they have already felt that, and will remember it fondly with gratitude. I might not be there, so I want all the people around them to do their best to nurture and support them to be strong individuals.

Actually they already are strong individuals, but I want my diagnosis to make them both aware of their vulnerabilities and the power of resilience. I continue to believe that my attitude to cancer’s challenges will hopefully give them values and lessons that will endure long after I’m gone. I’ve also always believed that it takes a whole village to bring up a child and we need this now more than ever.

It’s one of the many reasons I am open about my journey. My broad and varied support team are as invaluable to us now as I hope they will be if and when I’m gone.

This post is taking a surprisingly sentimental direction.

I’m anxious about my CT results.

I’m waiting in clinic to see an oncologist. The path forward is a bit hazy at the moment. I don’t mind tough terrain, I just want to know the plan. I’m hoping with equal parts that the current chemo is not working and is working. If the latter, I stay on my current regime. The former continues the fight for immunotherapy or any treatment that slows the spread.

I’ve waited 3 weeks for these results and it’s been two months since my last scan results. A lot can change in that time.

Where am I now?

I’m now on the last day of Cycle 3 of Capecitabine. I’ve been on the oral tablets 14 days on and 7 off for 9 weeks. With multiple anti-sickness tabs and a strong routine around food, I’ve managed to keep them down. The other side effects are pretty grim. The skin on my hands and feet is red raw and swollen, peeling in places and inflamed.

My fine motor skills are being challenged as my finger prints are smoothed out and the fingertips are bolbus. This is further exasperated by lymphoedema on my right arm and a suspected DVT. My iPhone doesn’t recognise my fingers and even hitting the right keys and letters is a challenge. My feet are sore after walking or standing for too long and they are burning hot.

I’m not letting any of this stop me walking or typing, but it makes it more tiring. I’m annoyed with my failing body. In fact what I am annoyed with is the chemo is effecting me adversely, yet it doesn’t appear to be working.

I wrote in a previous poem that I’m happy to poison myself in the now to see more future. With each chemo that fails this journey seems more futile and the path ahead less clear.

10th December 2019

“You look so well”

(For someone with terminal cancer)

Why do people constantly say this to you? Mostly I do look well. I make an effort with skincare and a bit of make up. I have a decent hair cut (as much as you can with post chemo curly regrowth). Despite my distorted and ever changing shape I try to wear clothes that make me feel good (balance of comfort, fit and style). For all intents and purposes I do look well. I am well.

Yet I have terminal breast cancer. I use that deliberately jarring word because unless I throw myself under a proverbial bus it is the advanced, secondary, stage 4, terminal, metastasised breast cancer cells that will kill me. (Although I have had a brief dalliance with a pulmonary embolism, but that’s a story for another day).

So, what does someone with stage 4 breast cancer look like? Even a year ago when I had stage 3 I didn’t think stage 4 would look and feel like this. This is why people sometimes write you off or feel pity for you when you have advanced cancer – they think you will look and act ill. I think it’s why they say [but] ‘you look so well’ in a surprised tone. They don’t fit the stereotype of someone with advanced cancer on their third series of chemotherapy and 7th chemo agent. It’s ignorance, maybe denial. Like me they think a stage 4er would be too ill to do most things.

Not me.

I’m still doing my upmost to grab life with both hands and be normal. I’m also on a quest to give people a perspective of what it is like to have to wake up every morning and face another day of tablets, treatment, appointments, fights to be heard and taken seriously.

The fight for your life every day.

The cancer is one thing, but the system is another. My daily fight is like this:

1) The system (disjointed, stretched past breaking point NHS system, drug company protocol, NICE guidelines, insurance company, the postcode lottery)
2) People’s ignorance, attitude and outdated stereotypical view of cancer
3) Treatment side effects (historic, cumulative and current)
4) My own demons and expectations about what I can do
5) The cancer
Once I’ve done that there’s the normal hectic life of a young family and that’s before the Christmas madness.

Despite this pile of things to battle I still want to enjoy my life and contribute to society. I crave normal, not extraordinary. I still want to help out on the school fireworks ‘glow store’ even though I couldn’t officially commit and just jumped on, on the night. I still want to do the garden, swim, cook, walk and work. Yes work.

I feel alive when I work. I feel like me. And that’s actually all you want to feel when you are fighting for your life. I was born to work. I love it. The week before last I did a piece of work designing all the facilitation sessions for a conference for 250 healthcare professionals. I trained the facilitators and made small talk through a sit down dinner. I smiled and offered paracetamol to the man with a cold and a headache. I did a good job. I contributed. I used my busy brain to help some other people and I earned some money. I was delighted to have the opportunity.

I checked out of the hotel the morning after and did battle with flooded rail lines. I got sent to Coventry (literally). I went around the problem (that’s what I do) and got home to dump my bags. I then turned around and got a train to London for yet another hospital appointment.

And you know what they said?

‘You look so well’

And I did. Yet, I was tired. My feet and hands were red and stinging from chemo induced side effects (apparently it’s the drug leeching out your capillaries) . I didn’t have enough oxygen from my low red blood count to climb stairs or walk far, my lymphoedema arm was enormous and heavy (32% bigger than my left arm). I could no longer get my coat on my arm. But I was still smiling and still keeping on keeping on.

It is a total paradox, on the one hand I want to be treated normally I am still me after all. On the other I am struggling mentally and physically to hold it together. I want and need to be able to park nearer or to have a seat on the tube, yet I look well and I don’t want special treatment. I am multi faceted and a contradiction.

I think I need to be kinder to myself. To give in to more help, so that I can get home from a whole day of hospital appointments in London and still have enough energy to help with the Roman project and read bedtime stories.

I suppose what I’m saying is I want people with cancer to not be marginalised by society because they don’t fit the mould of sick or well. Like me these people have much to contribute, but equally we need a hand with a few other things so we can keep doing so!

I want to be treated to live, not live to be treated.

Learn from the Poppies (Poem 18)

Learn from the Poppies

Like poppies, life is beautiful, fragile and fleeting,
Remember you don’t have to be killed at war,
To lose your life,
Cancer doesn’t have to be rife,
You can float through life striving for more,
Rather than making the most of every chance meeting

We should be silent at 11 O’Clock
Remembering those that gave us liberty,
Stillness and quiet, is a dying art,
Real conversations, swept away as we dart,
About playing at being happy and busy,
Losing your real life of simple pleasures that rock


11th November 2019

Mr Jones (Poem 17)

You drew cartoon boobs when we first met,
You marked me up with Sharpie,
You were to the point and all set,
I joked about stories for a dinner party
,

Nipple callipers and sample silicon hidden in your case,
Rolling back and forth between the private and NHS side,
Driven by clinical need, patient outcomes and pace,
Your work ethic and commitment cannot be denied.

I wish you’d had a magic wand not a scalpel,
The scans seemed certain, but they lied,
Meticulous precision could not conquer the way these cancer cells rule,
We’re still keeping on; it’s one hell of a ride.

Months later I’m back, punch biopsy of my scar inside,
Pathology confirmed what I always knew,
I didn’t need the scientific view,
No time for more surgery, more systematic treatment; more time to bide.

Started June 2019 when I found a tiny lump the size of a pin head in my mastectomy scar.  I was reflecting on surgery. 

People thought I was paranoid.  They said It was scar tissue.  I know my own body. 

Finished in October 2019 when I returned to my original surgeon for his opinion; which confirmed mine. 

Time for some cheer

I know the weekend’s post was a bit hard going. I lived it and reading it back was tough enough for me. So time for some cheer.

That’s the thing about cancer treatment; one minute you are crawling on your bathroom floor, the next you are whizzing around London having a fine time. Then you’re shattered again. ‘This too will pass’ has become regular self talk for me and many other cancer thrivers.

Today I made the trip for 10 vials of blood to be taken and tested to make sure all my organs are behaving themselves and have managed to process the 10 of the 14 days drugs I poisoned myself and hopefully the cancer with earlier this month.

Good news is, my liver and kidney function and my red, white and platelet cell factories seem in fighting spirit. And so too am I.

I’m still adjusting to the peaks and troughs of this new medication, but hopefully with a reduced dose and three lots of anti sickness drugs by my side I will navigate cycle 2 (and half term (!)) with a bit more grace.

I was lucky enough to get the prime viewing seat for my bloods today. The rain stayed away too.

Today involved, being weighed (1 min incl. lace up shoes) taking some bloods (10 mins), seeing an oncologist (which was less than 5 mins as I’ve been in and out with bad reactions so they are up to speed with my side effects), making an appointment for 3 weeks time (1 min), filing a prescription (2 mins) collecting two lots of drugs from two different places (5 mins) total to collect and walk between two places. So 24 active patient minutes. I left my house at 8.30 and got back to my town in time for a work meeting at 5pm. Granted the travel time is a big chunk of that, but I still spent over 5.5hrs waiting at various places or travelling between parts of the same building.

There has got to be some efficiencies to make there surely. I even transported my own bloods and handed them to a nurse to hand deliver to the lab, because the porter system can add another hour at least. No wonder we have a productivity problem in this country – all those people not working, but waiting, or waiting with someone who’s waiting.

They even have a poster to help manage your expectation

I’m an impatient patient. You may have picked that up! I hate inefficiency. If I can see a quicker, better, different path I like to take it or find it.

That said, Knowing that today would be a waiting day, I planned some jobs and some cheer. In between sorting my annual accounts, finishing a poem, drafting this and picking up some presents I managed a bit of cheer. I stumbled upon a cafe behind the hospital and decamped for some non-vending lunch. I then met Jimmy of ‘London Hearts’ fame for a coffee and to pick up my commission of our very own ‘Cosmic Heart’.

As I had expected he was a lovely bloke and very humble about his talents. I started to shake his hand, but that felt odd, so I gave him a big hug, which felt right. We chatted a while about his work, my blog, legacy, reaching out and connecting to your loved ones and inspiring communities of people to do the same. I am so glad I stumbled upon those hearts, pressed send on what seemed like a slightly unusual email and met the heart behind some of the world’s street art.

Despite the waiting, today was a good day. I feel good.

Sometimes that’s enough.

A Bitter Pill (or 10)

There is no doubt that mentally it’s tougher to physically swallow chemotherapy. Not least when you were hoping to avoid it and try immunotherapy.

Breakfast in bed never looked so appealing.

The last 3 weeks have been a blur. I’m hoping I’m through the worst. This post has been written a bit intermittently. 

Most of you know by now that I was on the placebo in the last clinical trial. After a bit of a scramble, I was lucky enough to get on another clinical trial. The last place globally, with a chance of getting Atezolizumab. 

Unfortunately I got the control, so as you know I’m not on immunotherapy I’m on chemo again. I’m so over chemo.

Passage produced the first weekend of the new chemo, Capecitabine:

I am now dictating this in the dark with my sunglasses on because I’ve been in bed since Saturday night, it’s now Monday morning and I have been pretty sick since Sat. This is my seventh type of chemo drug and my third block of chemo cycles. Naïvely I thought that this oral chemo would be convenient and fit around my life.

Oh how I was wrong.

I feel more unwell than when on any of the other chemos. When you sit and think about it, or lie in my case, the chemo pills are going down my throat and into my stomach and through my intestines, which is a lot of surface area for a cytotoxic drug to be in contact with. I can only assume that this is why I feel so ill.

It may also be the dosage which they may alter, but for now I am still trying to swallow 10 bitter chemo pills a day. I can just about handle swallowing them, but once they have melted or partially melted in my stomach, bringing them back up again is one of the most unpleasant things I have had to endure.

I cannot really put into words the feeling of that acidic liquid burning my throat on the way out.

I really thought the first lot of chemo I had back in June 2018 was the worst (which is why I have yet to write about it properly), but this seems to have really knocked me for six.

As truly revolting as the vomiting is, the headache which feels like my head is permanently in a vice and the photo sensitivity are debilitating. I’ve been lying in a dark room since Saturday night. Unable to read, watch TV or talk too much.

I am unsure whether my body‘s reaction to this is just a chemical one or if I am psychologically rejecting the control; the injustice and all-round bad luck in missing out on Atezolizumab again.

Dictated notes from the first lot of Capecitabine.

I am determined to blaze through this drug in the hope that it is doing to the cancer what it is doing to me. The week before last I ended up back in the hospital in London because the vomiting wouldn’t stop. After some monitoring and a lot of hanging around, I was sent home with additional anti-sickness drugs (or ‘Auntie Soonest’ as my dictation wrote the first time. I quite like that, she sounds like just the kind of person I need right now!).

It is slightly surreal waiting in this Cancer Assessment Unit looking through the pouring rain at the twinkling lights of the city. The streets below packed with the aftermath of ‘Extinction Rebellion’ and the state opening of parliament. Looking out at these two different fights and the enormity of their meaning make me and my plight feel insignificant. I like that. Big cities, vast skies and coastal vistas all make me feel small. They calm me.

After the first lot of sickness I was given 48 hour respite from the chemo to then begin again. 

Once I started up the chemo tablets again it didn’t seem quite as bad; then three days later it started. I had the headache, I was dizzy I couldn’t really talk I couldn’t read or watch TV. Once again I am dictating this into my phone in the dark.

Chemo is a bit like childbirth. No one really tells you what is is actually like and everyone’s experience is different anyway. Universally it’s pretty horrendous going through it, but the potential reward is worth it. Moreover the end result seems to wipe your memory of the enormity of the process of getting there. However, unlike the birth of both my children I was not rewarded at the end of the last two gruelling journeys.  That has certainly been my experience thus far. All that pain and horror for nothing.

Actually not nothing: disease progression.

I am left wondering if this particular chemo is so bad because unlike the others it’s really doing the job. That is all I can grip onto as I endeavour to endure another day.

Cancer is truly an evil bastard. Its treatment is something else. It is impossible to fathom the paradox of feeling relatively well when you are off treatment, with tumours growing everywhere, versus being on treatment and being debilitated.

Mummy I preferred it when you just had cancer, you were ok then, I think the chemotherapy is making you ill, can we go back to you just having cancer?

As my daughter said, right back at the beginning of the first lot of chemo. She was six then.

That’s how I feel right now.  This is why people stop treatment. At the moment I am wobbling my way along a tightrope between tolerable drug toxicity and drug efficacy.

My daughter is seven now. She has an amazing ability to cut through the crap and describe the heart of the situation. For example, when we finished chemotherapy the first time I went on to have three operations, each one hoping to get a clear margin around the cancer. Each one failing in its mission. As I got the last pathology report back in early December 2018, I was truly devastated to discover that there were still cancer cells in the margins. Teeny tiny bits of cancer in my blood and lymph vessels. I knew these where tributaries of two crucial fluid systems that move stuff around my body. This did not sound like a good place for cancer cells to hang out, however ‘microscopic’ they were. My surgeon told me I would probably have to have adjuvant chemo (after surgery) as well as the 18 weeks of neo adjuvant I had endured before surgery. 

This was the first moment I lost it in front of a consultant. My head crashed down on the other side of his enormous oak desk.

Bang!

“F**k!“ I screamed.

When we tried to explain this to the children, my daughter’s reaction was:

So mummy instead of being nearly at the end, we are actually right back at the beginning.

She nailed it then too.

It seems that killing cancer has to happen in a way that makes it feel like it’s killing you first.  Chemotherapy is what you call a systemic treatment. It is undiscriminating, attacking my whole body because the harsh reality is nobody knows where those microscopic cancer cells are hiding now.

So long story short, the same thing happened when I restarted the Cape (as it is known to its friends(!!)).This time I decided not to go to A&E. I took my pulse, temp and BP at home and they were all OK (that’s the first 2-3hrs of being in A&E covered). I didn’t have an infection. I was massively dehydrated and exhausted from vomiting. We phoned the hospital hotline again and said we were stopping the drugs in order to get some fluids back into me. We did and within a few hours I was improving. Once well enough (ish!) to travel to hospital, the oncologist came to the same conclusion as me. It was the tablets and nothing more sinister.

Whilst my reaction was a bit adverse it wasn’t unheard of.

I checked the dosing levels for my body surface area (my husband worked that calculation out) and we felt I was on a pretty high dose. Tipping into the criteria for 10 tablets by a fraction. Chemo sounds like a very precise treatment, but the truth is the dosing levels are quite a blunt tool. It’s unbelievably a bit of trial and error. Thing is, it’s me that is being experimented on. I have had to have my dose reduced on every other chemo drug due to toxicity and adverse reactions, so I guess this is where we are headed.

So after some good peer to peer discussion the oncologist and I agreed that I would give it another go at 80% of the original dose. So only 8 tablets a day now. I’d also have a break until the beginning of the next new cycle to let my body recover. This has given me a week or so to get back to myself, which aside from the cumulative cancer side effects I am now. Hence I thought I’d better get you lovely lot up to speed.

I want to give this chemo a good go because as I have said before the list of possible options for TNBC is very short. I’d be a fool to write one off at the first (few) hurdle(s).

New dose, new attitude, new drug administration regime with three lots of anti sickness tablets.

Let’s do this.

Again.

You don’t have to wear pink (Poem 16)

You don’t have to wear pink

You don’t have to wear pink,
To be aware of breast cancer,
It’s become so big, people don’t think
It will happen to them.

If you do one thing today,
Make sure you know how to check,
I know you don’t think you have cancer in your deck.
In Britain 31 women will die of breast cancer everyday
.

Real sisters, mothers, daughters, aunts, wives,
Lose their lives.
Everyday.
Why not me? And why not you?
Don’t be passive, there are things you can do;
Real conversations, commit to checking.
Because
Real lives, cancer is wrecking.

18th October 2019 Breast Cancer Awareness Day

Street Art Update

Amidst all the trial and randomisation anxiety of last week, you may recall I promised you I’d get in contact with Jimmy C of ‘London Hearts’  and ‘Shakespeare’ portrait fame. 

I did this last Tuesday and both himself and the guy who commissioned the piece at Network Rail got in touch overnight.  A great example of how we should all reach out to others, especially if they have inspired us and even if we don’t know each other.  We are after all, all humans with an inate need to be connected, noticed and appreciated.  They were both pleased to hear the positive impact the work had had on me (and my family). I have agreed to credit the work where possible and of course I am not about to make or sell products that depict Jimmy’s or any other street artists work. So all good.  

While researching Jimmy’s art I also noticed that the Shakespeare piece has had an update (see below) since earlier in the summer. 

Latest image of Shakespeare at Bankside by James Cochran (AKAJimmyC)

Nothing stands still, it all evolves.  In the same way that the recent rain has bought its own iteration of the drip painting under the arches. 

On speaking to Jimmy I also learnt that the Shakespeare piece is available as a print for £60 from The Globe. He didn’t ask me to promote this, I just thought I would. 

I’ve also commissioned a canvas of the cosmic hearts to hang in our home and remind us all that love is the best response in dark times.

12th October 2019. 
(Posted 16th October after a brief respite from chemo induced vomiting etc.)