Isn’t it all a distraction until we die?

I have been distracting myself quite nicely this week by filling my time with productive ‘busy-ness’. I often do this when I don’t want to think about big things. It drives my husband crazy.  Watching telly and reading books are tricky as my mind wanders easily and there also seems to be someone dying of cancer or being diagnosed with it on every channel or page.  I guess that’s representative as 1 in 2 of us will get cancer and 1 in 7 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer.  It’s still annoying when you are trying to get away from cancer for a bit.

I can’t wait for next month and breast cancer awareness! It’s always annoyed me even before I had breast cancer – all those pink ribbons and decorated bras. Granted the awareness job cannot be denied – 5,000 people will be diagnosed next month. However, that pale pink ribbon seems a bit pathetic when it’s the second most common cause of cancer death in UK women.  That accounts for about 11,500 deaths a year.  So roughly 31 women died of breast cancer yesterday, today, tomorrow and the next day. 

When you spend time with women or being a woman on chemo for life, fighting the spread of breast cancer, dealing with lymphoedema, mastectomy nerve damage, one or no boobs, skin mets bursting out of their chest, a dainty pink ribbon seems a bit trite. It has become a ‘thing’ in its own right and I wonder whether people see beyond knowing what it stands for?

God, there’s two weeks to go and it’s already winding me up. I’ve also got to get through the Macmillan Coffee mornings. Last year I was invited to several and most people didn’t know I had cancer. At least this year I’m out and proud, maybe I’ll go in sequins and represent cancer pride? I’m clearly not proud to have cancer, but I am proud that I am still here smiling (mostly). I am not going to hide my cancer (diagnosis) in any closet. I am also proud of my friends and family for all their support and ability to hold themselves together (around me at least). 

So apart from turning out cupboards and tidying sheds (can’t blame the steroids anymore) I’ve also been doing some ‘nice’ things. 

I’ve always had a bit of a creative side. I like painting, design and making things. I’ve resisted getting back into painting for fear of what might end up on the canvas.  I thought the anger (which is only recently making an appearance) might spill out through the end of my paint brushes creating a disturbing legacy of my inner mind. Stuff obviously needed to come out though, which is why I think the poems turned up in my life at the beginning of this year. 

Last month I signed up for a last minute art course at our local art place.  I saw it on social media late one evening and thought ‘I fancy doing that’.  Often this would be accompanied by ‘one day’, but I’m more of a ‘now’ person than ever before (for obvious reasons).  It’s very liberating.

If there is something you love doing or think you’d like to have a go at, do it. Don’t wait. 

The course was in geli plate printing. You use a silicone plate a bit like a giant slice of posh grown up jelly dessert or quince jelly on the side of a cheese board. You use this instead of a press or a screen to make a monotype print. I have never done this before, but I did textile design and screen printing at school and I absolutely loved it. I still have my work in the loft somewhere (that’s next for the turn out). I assumed the course was for a couple of hours. It was actually for a day. Husband was very accommodating, so all worked out brilliantly.

The course was absorbing, fun and very therapeutic as no one on the course knew me or that I had advanced cancer. The technique was also very conducive to my state of mind as it allowed me to be totally captive to something else with little room for the busy mind to race.  The teacher taught us a 3/3/3 principle which was the number of seconds you have to put the paint on, arrange your relief material (leaves in this case) and print. Then peel off and print again. Then more paint and go again. It was fast. Fast process, fast results. The total opposite of treating cancer. No time to think. Perfect for my anxious cancer obsessed mind. 

So since the day I spent covered in paint and immersed in creating prints at high speed, I have bought my own press and had a go at home.  Aside from the resulting prints (which are of mixed quality and success) the actual process was so engaging and cathartic that I’ll be trying it again. 

It got me thinking much more deeply about art and creativity. 

We tend to judge art on the end result and not the enjoyment of the process. The thing, not the experience. I genuinely like experiencing and trying new things. I get a thrill from learning to do something different, from the learning itself. It’s a cliche, but I guess we could all learn to enjoy the ride and not focus solely on the destination. After all, we are all going to end up in the same place.  The ride differentiates us. 

Statistic from Breast Cancer Care and Cancer Research websites.

3 thoughts on “Isn’t it all a distraction until we die?

  1. I’d love to see some more of these. Can we get a gallery of shots? It’s hard to fully understand the process (I just keep thinking about kids jelly!)

    It is, like you say, all a distraction from the process of aging and dying. Keeping busy, moving forward. I feel like you have taken more time to stand still in the last year though, in a way I rarely attempt. Embracing this writing, starting your art. Busy living.

    My own personal discovery this summer has been a giant jigsaw puzzle. Not something I have ever attempted before, but abandoned by the kids as too complicated, too difficult. I started adding a piece or two whilst the kettle was boiling and have now found myself fully engrossed in the art of searching and fitting those little pieces together. A strangely hypnotic and addictive distraction that shuts out the outside world for just a little bit.

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  2. I am so with you – the need for distraction, to drown out the noise in your head and be fully immersed in something else. It’s great you have found something to give you some reprieve from all the cancer shit!

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  3. I’ve really enjoyed reading your blog Claire. It’s so well written and really made me stop to think about what it must be like to live with cancer and appreciate the mundane in my life which I take for granted. You are so inspiring, please keep writing Claire.

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