‘Last’ chemo

So today is my ‘last’ chemo and I haven’t even written about chemo properly. I think that might have to wait. It’s just a bit too grim for today.

Suffice to say that not all chemo is the same and everyone’s reaction is very different. That’s why you have an oncologist who specialises in this dark art of managing the tight rope between efficacy and toxicity (think this is a polite way of saying killing the cancer or killer your organs/you). We haven’t killed all the cancer yet, but on the plus side we haven’t killed me either, so all good. Told you it was all about perspective. 

I put inverted commas around ‘last’ because when you have metastatic cancer (cancer that has spread from its original site) your know that your last chemo is unlikely to be your last. In fact it’s often the only treatment option to keep your disease controlled, so chemo kind of becomes your friend. Developing chemo resistance or running out of chemo options is actually a bad thing as it means your disease is out manoeuvring the possible treatment. You then move into palliative options that make your life more comfortable while the disease does its thing. Let’s not go there yet.

Back to today. Today is my last chemo for a while. That feels good. I have 18 weeks of four types of chemo last summer into early Autumn (which depressingly didn’t really work).  This Spring/Summer I had another 18 weeks. Still six cycles of the cytotoxic stuff, but this time I had two types (Gemcitabine and Carboplatin or GemCarbo to its friends) two weeks out of every three. I’m on a clinical trial so I might be getting immunotherapy too. Alternatively I might be getting water (placebo), which is frustrating, but a reality.  Even though GemCarbo is an older chemo combo I knew it was getting results with triple negative breast cancer based on my obsessive google reading. It was therefore worth the travel to a research hospital and the gamble of getting Atezolizmubab, which is also getting great results (more on that later). After today I will still have cycles of immunotherapy every three weeks. 

I feel very mixed about today because so far we think this chemo is working. It’s shrinking or should I say shrunk my secondary tumour. I worry that stopping it will mean it pops up somewhere else or starts growing again. Or it reoccurs in my chest wall, skin or sternum from the original site.

I think of metastatic cancer as mould spores. You know how they lurk unseen on bread, barely visible as tiny white specks, then BOOM, you’ve got patches of mould all over the side of the loaf. Leave it lurking at the bottom of the bread bin and before you know it, it has turned into an unrecognisable bag of dust. 

I don’t want that to happen to me. I think we’ll leave the brown bread and toast analogies right there. 

So we are on the hunt for those mould spores. Actually you know what, that’s rubbish you can’t even see them on the most sophisticated scan (A PET), so we can’t really hunt for them.  I prefer to accept that they are definitely there, we just need to be ready and waiting like ninjas for when they pop up. This is a more proactive and realistic way to view the approach to metastatic cancer. 

Between the blood tests and chemo, I’m having a CT Scan today too. I have them every 8 weeks to check for disease progression, or large patches of mould!  I have so many scans I even have a scan outfit (winter and summer).  It’s an outfit I have perfected that manages to be metal free and not look like pjs, whilst still allowing access to my port-a-cath. It allows you to complete you scan without the need to get dressed and undressed.  A time saving decision, plus it also saves the faff of trying to fit and re-fit my prosthesis or being exposed with one boob in a corridor.   

I won’t get the scan results for two weeks, but last time the treatment was working. Maybe I’m getting the immunotherapy or maybe the GemCarbo has worked.  

This constant cycle of treatment and scans can get a bit wearing.  I tend to approach it by making treatment options based on the worst case scenario and life decisions on the best case scenario.  I find this helps you make the best of each day whilst hoping that you are creating more days.

I was here this morning for bloods at 9am, but I won’t get chemo until much later as they have to do a lot of tests to make sure my body can handle the dose, then they have to order the drugs from pharmacy.  It is now gone 3pm and still no sign of a seat in a purple chair.  This means steroids after 4pm and no chance of sleep tonight.  Another thing to accept and roll with.

They are calling me in. Let’s do this one more time.

One thought on “‘Last’ chemo

  1. Hope you weren’t too long in the purple chair and just give the house a good scrub tonight on those steroids.

    Loving the practical tips too. Heartfelt and informative – our Claire 😂

    Liked by 1 person

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